The Bank and Savings Museum

A visit to the Bank and Savings Museum is a look into the history of Danish banking system of the 1800s.

A banking systems history
The museum gives you the whole story about a time when banks were increasingly important for both Danish and international finances. You can see Danish bank Privatbanken’s first director C. F. Tietgen's office, where you can get better acquainted with one of Denmark's most important financial men. With original objects from the 19th century the museum shows the true banking industry.

C. F. Tietgen
As one of Denmark’s history's biggest promoters of the industrial and financial development, C. F. Tietgen is indispensable when it comes to Danish business history. At the Bank and Savings Museum you get the story behind the man who among other things completed work on the Marble Church in 1894 and had a major impact on companies such as Danisco and Tuborg. The exhibition includes furniture and equipment from Tietgen's own private office.

Memories of a bank
The museum presents a collection of objects from the 1800s and has a fully equipped bank branch from around 1900. Furthermore the museum has a large collection of old maps and engravings from Copenhagen and Christianshavn originally owned by the Heering family, who lived in the building where the museum is now located.

Heering’s old headquarters
The Bank and Savings museum has its origins in a small museum that was established at the Stock Exchange in 1957 in connection to the 100th anniversary of Privatbanken. It is decorated in an old merchant's house from the 1700s at Christianshavn, which in 1839 was taken over by merchant Peter F. Heering, world renowned for his cherry liqueur Cherry Heering. Until 1977 the building was the headquarters of Heering’s business, but is now owned by Nordea Denmark Foundation.

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Practical information

Website

The Bank and Savings Museum
Overgaden neden Vandet 11
1414 Copenhagen K
Telephone: +45 60 80 20 22
E-mail: The Bank and Savings Museum

Opening hours
Wednesday 1.30 PM – 4.30 PM

Admission
Free