Hørsholm City Museum - North Zealand Museums

At Hørsholm City Museum you can pry into the 1700s royal affairs and see how a boy looked 7,500 years ago.

From Stone Age tombs to royal pleasure palace
This is the story of the royal summer residence Hirschholm Palace and the story of Struensee and Queen Caroline Mathilde. But you also meet Paleolithic hunters from the area around the city Nivå. With archaeological and historical objects the museum presents three prestigious exhibitions which give you an insight into the history of Denmark and North Zealand.

A historic scandal
Hirschholm Palace, also known as the "Versailles of the North" and the royal family's pleasure palace, was built around 1740 by King Christian 6 and his Queen Sophie Magdalene. The palace was designed by architect Lauritz de Thurah and was considered one of Europe's most beautiful palaces. The building was also the setting for one of Denmark’s history's great scandals - the love affair between King Christian 7’s physician Johann Friedrich Struensee and Queen Caroline Mathilde. Streunsee was executed in 1772 and in 1810 King Frederik 6 decided to demolish the palace.  

From the soil of Nivå
In the exhibition "Stone Age hunters from Nivå" you can see some of the startling discoveries recently made in the area. The excavations have attracted international attention with unique examples of hunters' huts and tombs that tell about people's beliefs and practices. The exhibition presents tools, animal bones and jewelry found in the cottages and ritual objects that were important symbols in the hunters' beliefs. See two graves from the Stone Age, one with a man and a woman, the other with a man and a three-year old child. Each bone placed exactly as they were, when buried 7,500 years ago.

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Hørsholm Museum
Sdr. Jagtvej 2-4
2970 Hørsholm
Telephone: +45 72 17 02 40
Email: Hørsholm Museum

Opening hours
Tuesday-Sunday 1 PM - 4 PM
Monday closed
December and January closed

Local Archives
Tuesday 10 AM - 12
Wednesday 1 PM - 5 PM

Admission
Free